It’s no secret that there are WordPress plugins available to specifically help your SEO, but sometimes it can be tricky to decide which plugins you want to use. There are thousands of different plugins to choose from, and uploading too many plugins to your site can get cluttered and confusing. You want to make sure that you have only the plugins you absolutely need in order to help your SEO, and you want to make sure you have a good variety when it comes to the function of these plugins. One plugin that doesn’t get much attention is a cache plugin. It’s easy to ask yourself: Is it worth uploading to help your SEO efforts, or is it just another fancy feature?

How a Cache Plugin Works for WordPress

A cache plugin is essentially a plugin that improves webpage load times. The term “cache” refers to when copies of your webpage are made (usually in HTML) and then stored on your hosting server. Because all of these copies are made and ready to go, the server can push out a cached version of your webpage to users quickly. Even if you do not have a cache plugin, your pages will still go through a cache process—a plugin just helps make it easier.

So will a cache plugin help your SEO? The answer is a resounding “yes.” Website speed and load time is an important factor when it comes to SEO, so this plugin will help make sure you have that aspect covered.

Top WordPress Cache Plugins for Your Site

Finding a cache plugin for WordPress isn’t too difficult, but as with all plugins, it helps to have a few ideas before you begin sifting through the many choices to find the one that’s right for you. Below are a few of my favorites:

  • W3 Total Cache. This is the most popular plugin and is used by major sites like Mashable and Smashing Magazine. It has many different, advanced settings, so it’s great for beginners or those looking for something more.
  • WP Super Cache. This is a good choice for sites that have a lot of traffic. I’ve never personally used this plugin, but it has good reviews and claims that 99% of visitors are served with static HTML files.
  • Quick Cache. This is also a popular choice for beginners because it is easy to use. It has not been updated since December 2011, however, so some have shied away. It’s still worth a try if you’re doing a few test runs.
  • Hyper Cache. This is another plugin that always makes the lists you’ll find online. As it says in the Hyper Cache description, this plugin is “specifically written for people which have their blogs on low resources hosting provider (cpu and mysql).”

Has your company ever installed a WordPress cache plugin? Did you find that your load times and SEO improved?